Posts Tagged With: Cargo bike

Bicycle Gardening

Yes, what to do with the surplus of rusty and twisted bicycle wheels that no longer are able to serve the purpose for which they were made? If  you are like me, you just cannot bring yourself to send them out to pasture at the metal recycler’s – somehow that just doesn’t seem right.

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Well, I found some other uses for these wheels – in the garden. Check these out for starters:

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Towers for scarlet runner beans – add some EMT conduit to those rusty old rims, splash on some spray paint to cover the rust, and VOILA! in no time, scarlet runners will thank you for providing a place to climb, and you will thank them for adding their lovely scarlet red flowers to the beauty of your garden. The bees will thank you also!IMG_1601 2

As you can see, the towers are “geared” for the job. Sorry, I couldn’t resist that.

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Beet cages. No, not to keep the beets in. Rather, to keep the hungry jack rabbits out. There is a very healthy population of rabbits in the city, and last year when I went to harvest the beets from my plot at the community garden, I discovered that the rabbits had “beet” me too it. (Sorry, I couldn’t help that one either) So this is a test run to see  if this will work.

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Broccoli protection. My green thumb partner grows the very best broccoli, starting the seeds inside while snow is still on the ground and then moving the plants into our wicking raised beds. We usually eat broccoli right up until the snow flies in the fall again. This year we are going to be selfish and not share with the cabbage butterflies who like to infest the plants. I wrapped crop cover around the frames, allowing sunshine and rain in and keeping the butterflies out.IMG_1605

There is a shot from further back with both frames covered. Oh, yes, and an excuse to show off the cargo e-bike that I built last year. That is my favoured ride when going to the community garden to check for those pesky rabbits!

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Moustachio – the transformation is complete

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Once the components were chosen, assembly could take place. Wheels were greased and trued. Duro Sierra tires were selected – puncture resistant, with reflective sidewalls. Derailleurs were installed – the front one original and the rear one new – a Shimano Alivio RD-M410. Cabling was configured for derailleurs and brakes.  Wrap-around fenders and a sturdy rear carrier were included in the mix, adding functionality and style. My Lion Bellworks bell was transferred from the Expediter light duty cargo bike to the new city bike.

Then for a new experience – wrapping the moustache handlebars. Before tackling the job, I went online and discovered that there are as many experts on the topic as there ways to wrap handlebars. By combining the ideas and approaches that seemed to make the most sense to me, the job was completed and the results very satisfying.

Next up – a test ride, followed by a photo shoot. The test ride proved exhilarating – the light frame and narrow tires coupled with the ability to “get down” on the moustache bars produces a fun ride that turns heads when you stop long enough for folks to appreciate it. Great fun.

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Working Cargo – for sale

 

 

Yes, that hard working lime green beauty is for sale. Summer is closing in – another cargo bike is taking shape on the jig in the shop and so room has to be made for the newcomer.

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That bike and I have had some good times this summer – picking up groceries for the evening meal and propane gas to cook it.

RecyclingWe have taken cans and bottles to the recycling depot.

To the recycle depot

Loaded

 

We have replenished our supply of cans also. By the way, for anyone needing supplies for a party, the cargo deck will hold 6 dozen cans in one layer, twelve dozen if you double it… :o)A beer run

 

One of the unexpected advantages of a cargo bike came one day when we stopped for a coffee at one of our favourite spots, The Roastery at Five Corners. There were no tables left in the shade so we pulled the bike under a tree, and parked ourselves on the cargo bay – instant park bench!!IMG_5302_2

 

 

 

 

Working cargo

 

 

 

For fun we have carried lumber home from the lumberyard, – just to see if we could do it!!

Recently we used the bike to get us to a picnic on the river, carrying the chilled wine and our contribution to the feast along with our folding chairs – good times!

Heading to a picnicYes, good times for the next owner also. Who will it be? See the ad on Kijiji, or send me a note if you want to be the one.

Categories: Cargo bikes | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Transition – Mountaineer to Expediter

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It started with an idea, a challenge to be met Bicycles are great ways of getting ourselves around but often we have “stuff” that we want to take with us. The old wire baskets that many of us used to have on our bicycles are inadequate for many of the things that we would like to carry these days. What to do? The low bed cargo bike that I built has much more capacity than is often required when not going on  a serious shopping trip and yet I still wanted a way to carry some of my “stuff”.

Often the solutions that we come up are not original ideas but rather ones that we have “borrowed” from others, and that is what happened in this case. I have seen photos of light duty cargo bikes, carrying “stuff” on racks over the front wheel – this extends the cargo carrying capacity of a regular bicycle but keeps the bike compact enough to remain an “about-town” form of transportation. That is what I decided to build and thus began the transition. All I needed was a “donor” bike, and the one I found was an early model Norco mountain bike, named appropriately but without much originality “Mountaineer”.

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Even though the bike was saddle worn and a bit rough around the edges with chipped paint and rusty cables, missing wheels and brake pads, there were still lots of good miles waiting to be ridden – it was not time to put this horse out to pasture yet!!

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After all, not only did the bike come from the well-known Canadian bicycle manufacturer, Norco, but it had originally been sold by one of the landmark bike shops in Saskatoon, Joe’s Cycle. It had a pedigree and it also had some history.

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Hence the transition began, on a jig that I built to accommodate this and future cargo bike builds.IMG_8202

By using a smaller front wheel smaller and by pushing it forward, a place was made for carrying cargo.

All that remained was to join the front to the back… IMG_8209

Add the cargo bay…IMG_8223

Now to the paint booth. Throw on some primer…IMG_8227

Add some colour…IMG_8235

And a bit of bling…IMG_8241

Some cedar for the cargo deck…IMG_8255

A few recycled components…IMG_8253

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Now add to the mix some carefully selected new components:

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Swept back handlebars allowing an upright riding stance

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New Shimano  TX50 Tourney thumb shifters and ergonomic four finger Tektro brake levers

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Aluminum Wellgo CU-214 City Pedals with ball bearings and Cro-Mo machined spindles 

 

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Fenders, front and rear

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Kenda Pathfinder rear tire, low profile and selected for reduced rolling resistance

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IMG_8341Centre kickstand to allow easy loading

There you have it – the transition is complete – from Mountaineer to Expediter – a re-purposed bicycle ready to deliver rider and goods with style and pizzaz. Order yours today!!

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FIRST VILLAGE CYCLEWORKS CARGOBIKE HITS THE STREET

First Cargobike

First Cargobike

Ready for the street

Ready for the street

Double kickstand made from front forks

Double kickstand made from front forks

Front forks used for cargo bay bracing

Front forks used for cargo bay bracing

Rear stays used for bracing cargo bay

Rear stays used for bracing cargo bay

Steering linkage using an Atomic Zombie "conductor"

Steering linkage using an Atomic Zombie “conductor”

For whom the bell chimes

For whom the bell chimes

My brass Lion Bellworks bicycle bell – the best sounding bell in town!!

Shortened front forks

Shortened front forks

Ever since I first encountered cargo bikes on the internet a few years ago, they have captured my imagination. Finally this past winter, while waiting for some special order components for the recumbent tricycle that was on the go, I decided to try my hand at building one. As the winter dragged on, there was ample time to contemplate so many aspects of the design. I wanted to maximize the use of parts of old bikes and so they found their way into supports for the cargo bay as well as a double legged stand. Many of the ideas came from my limited experience with the designs that I purchased from AtomicZombie.com, most notably the “conductor” used in the steering assemblage. The front forks were shortened to accommodate a 20 inch wheel, following the directions from Atomic Zombie.

The cargo bike seemed like the perfect place to show off the wonderful brass bike bell that I won during the winter in a poetry contest hosted by bikehacks.com. The bell is the product of Lion Bellworks.co.uk – the sustained ring that it produces does wonders for the soul and reminds one to slow down and enjoy all of our senses when riding – the Zen of cargo-bike riding!!

Categories: Cargo bikes | Tags: , , , | 3 Comments

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